Meth rehab facility promise for Kimberley

Glenn CordingleyBroome Advertiser
Labor said the goals were to reduce supply, demand and harm caused by the drug.
Camera IconLabor said the goals were to reduce supply, demand and harm caused by the drug. Credit: Getty Images/EyeEm

WA Labor leader Mark McGowan has unveiled plans for a methamphetamine rehabilitation facility in the Kimberley.

Announcing the pre-election pledge in Broome today, Mr McGowan said the move was part of a strategy to address a lack of treatment options in the region.

He said the goals were to reduce supply, demand and harm caused by the drug.

“There is clearly a lack of treatment options for meth addiction in the Kimberley and trying to get addicts to travel to the city for help simply does not work,” he said.

Labor leader Mark McGowan with shadow shadow Aboriginal affairs Ben Wyatt in Broome.
Camera IconLabor leader Mark McGowan with shadow shadow Aboriginal affairs Ben Wyatt in Broome. Credit: Broome Advertiser, Glenn Cordingley

The new facility will include support services that cater for the long withdrawal and recovery period and high relapse rate associated with meth use.

Mr McGowan said the location would be determined through consultation with service providers and the community to ensure the best clinical outcomes are achieved.

A key component will be the introduction of rehabilitation prisons that will target resources at low-level, non-violent offenders serving short prison sentences.

“These offenders offer the best chance of being rehabilitated,” Mr McGowan said.

“There is chronic shortage of beds for addicts that actually want to get help. These people actually can’t get the help they need now.

“Existing services in the Kimberley simply cannot keep up with demand and it’s clear that meth addiction is now a huge problem confronting the Kimberley.”

Mr McGowan said WA Labor would also pump $20million over five years into the WA Indigenous Ranger program to provide indigenous people in remote areas with “real” jobs and opportunities.

Mr McGowan said indigenous rangers would benefit the environment while reducing poverty, and increasing health and wellbeing.

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