Clontarf graduates are all work-ready

Jakeb WaddellBroome Advertiser
Broome Clontarf Academy Year 12 graduates Quentin Turner, Sam Flemming, Woora McLarty, Riccardo Grande and David Ningella.
Camera IconBroome Clontarf Academy Year 12 graduates Quentin Turner, Sam Flemming, Woora McLarty, Riccardo Grande and David Ningella. Credit: Picture: Jakeb Waddell, Jakeb Waddell.

An education academy that uses football as a tool to increase indigenous school attendance has helped each of its recent Broome graduates secure an employment or training opportunity next year.

The Clontarf Foundation, which has rolled out its program to 129 high schools across the nation, uses Aussie rules football to encourage Aboriginal children to focus on their studies, while boosting attendance in the classroom and creating post- education pathways.

Twenty-five Broome Clontarf Academy students completed Year 12 this year, between Broome Senior High School and St Mary’s College.

BCA director Jack Reagan said each graduating student had already had lined up a job or study pathway in areas including university, oil and gas, mining, and different trades.

“A key component of the program is being work-ready after finishing Year 12 and the boys have worked extremely hard towards this,” he said.

The graduates were among the group of young men across all year levels that were celebrated at the BCA awards night last month.

Youngsters were recognised in categories such as most improved, dedication to culture and even best bloke, as well as for commitment to employment, training, attendance and academic performance.

Mr Reagan said the evening was a good chance to highlight the achievements of participants with families, community members, staff and partners.

“It is important to celebrate the positive contribution these students are making to their schools and community,” he said.

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