Road plans revised

Glenn CordingleyBroome Advertiser
Bluey’s Place fish and chip shop owner Mark Trezise and The Aarli restaurant manager Stuart Munro are against right hand turn access into the car park (pictured behind) being blocked.
Camera IconBluey’s Place fish and chip shop owner Mark Trezise and The Aarli restaurant manager Stuart Munro are against right hand turn access into the car park (pictured behind) being blocked. Credit: Glenn Cordingley, Glenn Cordingley.

A $1.2 million road safety project in Broome will be “revised” after takeaway food and restaurant bosses complained the preliminary design would drastically reduce customer vehicle access to their businesses and cost them money.

The Shire of Broome has engaged civil engineers Pritchard Francis to re-design the Hamersley Street and Napier Terrace intersection, along with modifying median islands and vehicle and pedestrian movements.

Initial plans block the existing right hand turn for motorists travelling west on Hamersley Street leading to a carpark servicing the cluster of eateries, near the junction.

A number of shopkeepers were furious because they said it had the potential to drastically reduce customer traffic as it left only one access point on the left hand side of Hamersley Street.

Bluey’s Place fish and chip shop owner Mark Trezise said his sales figures would drop by 20 to 30 per cent if the slip road was closed.

“Restricting access for customers wanting to turn into the car park and buy a meal here would hurt us all badly,” he said.

“I have been at the shop 10 years and have never seen a traffic accident at that particular location.”

Cairo Cafe owner Osama Mohamed said the money would be better spent on areas needing road modifications.

“This has the ability to really hurt our businesses as most customers drive here and turn right into the public carpark next to my shop,” he said.

The Aarli restaurant manager Stuart Munro said the proposed measures would create confusion and restrict access to established restaurants and eateries.

“The current system works at the moment,” he said.

“People can just drive in quickly and grab their takeaway food. If the access is blocked, they just won’t come here as there won’t be anywhere to park.”

Shire director of infrastructure Steven Harding said the council secured Federal funding to upgrade the intersection because it has been recognised as an accident black spot, with 12 reported crashes in the past five years.

He said stakeholders were were contacted directly in late 2016 to canvass feedback on a preliminary design for an improved intersection.

“Feedback received as part of that process has been taken into account and a revised design is now being developed,” he said.

Mr Harding said there would be further consultation ahead of work commencing later this year.

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