Neighbours fight crime

Headshot of Carly Laden
Carly LadenBroome Advertiser
Email Carly Laden
Elya Stanbrook, Les Andrews and Megan Wa are ready to get to know their neighbours on Sunday.
Camera IconElya Stanbrook, Les Andrews and Megan Wa are ready to get to know their neighbours on Sunday. Credit: Broome Advertiser

While police are working hard to combat crime in Broome, a group of determined community members have teamed up to encourage others to play a part.

Broome Neighbourhood Watch is advising residents to take part in Get to Know Your Neighbour Day from 4pm on Sunday, encouraging them to swap numbers and discuss ways to prevent crime on their street.

Broome Neighbourhood Watch member Megan Wa said she and fellow group member Graham Chapman were discussing ways to encourage the community to step up and play their part in reducing crime.

“It started out as posting little reminders in the Broome Neighbourhood Watch Facebook group but we wanted to find a way to really get the message out to as many people as possible,” she said.

“Graham Chapman and I eventually decided to have a meeting with Broome police’s officer in charge Les Andrews and we discussed ways to ramp up the Broome Neighbourhood Watch’s presence in town.

“We also heard about an initiative within Neighbourhood Watch WA, where they hold Good Neighbour Day although it is usually held in March.

“So we thought we would hold something similar in the wet season to start at ground level and encourage everyone to get to know their neighbours and think of ways to look out for each other, especially if people leave town to go on holidays.”

Ms Wa said she hoped Get to Know Your Neighbour Day would take on a similar approach to events such as Earth Hour.

“We really needed to think about what time would be suitable for as many people as possible to take part in this,” she said.

“We figured Sunday afternoon would work best for everyone.”

Senior Sergeant Andrews said the Get to Know Your Neighbour Day was a “fantastic initiative”.

“It will really enhance security of the community, especially in the more intimate areas like the suburbs,” he said.

“What we find is that when we have a burglary, we do a cocooning package, meaning we’ll hand out pamphlets to the left, right, across the road and behind the affected property and that seems to be when people first find out there’s been an incident.

“This way, if we get to know our neighbours, there’s a better chance for everyone to know what’s going on around them; if they all keep in touch and keep tabs on any suspicious behaviour.”

Get the latest news from thewest.com.au in your inbox.

Sign up for our emails