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Kimberley informed trauma care research project in progress thanks to million-dollar funding

Cain AndrewsBroome Advertiser
KAMS social and emotional wellbeing manager Zac Cox, KAMS senior research officer Emma Carlin, BRAMS Model of Care co-ordinator Erina Tanaka, RCSWA  research fellow Steve Pratt, and KAMS mental health executive manager Kristen Orazi.
Camera IconKAMS social and emotional wellbeing manager Zac Cox, KAMS senior research officer Emma Carlin, BRAMS Model of Care co-ordinator Erina Tanaka, RCSWA research fellow Steve Pratt, and KAMS mental health executive manager Kristen Orazi. Credit: Supplied

A new Kimberley health research project, studying how to better care for traumatised patients is now in progress thanks to nearly $1 million investment from a Federal Government development body.

The Cooperative Research Centre for Developing Northern Australia has provided $955,000 to fund the joint research program for three years, which will also analyse how adversity and trauma can effective patient health outcomes.

In addition to the CRCNA, Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services and Broome Regional Aboriginal Medical Service and the Transforming Indigenous Mental Health and Wellbeing Research Project will match the funding with in-kind contributions.

University of WA Medical School research fellow and KAMS Senior research officer Emma Carlin, who will lead the project, said she was thrilled to receive the $955,000 funding on behalf of the partnership team.

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“I am grateful for the opportunity that has been provided to us by the CRCNA, all partners are committed to optimising the way in which Aboriginal people are cared for through their clinical journey,” she said.

CRCNA chief executive Anne Stunzner said she was delighted to be working with UWA to undertake the project.

“We are keen to support the project to link in with stakeholders across northern Australia to reflect, share, and learn from each other in the emerging space of trauma and wellbeing informed care,” she said.

Researchers will work with community clinics around the Kimberley to develop and implement wellbeing informed care approaches for Aboriginal Community Controlled primary health care in a culturally secure way.

In support of the research, BRAMS chief executive Cassie Atchison said the project reflected the agency’s emphasis on providing person-centred services.

“This important work aligns perfectly with our Model of Care and will enhance all aspects of the way we engage and care for the local community,” she said.

The partnership aims to develop an Aboriginal community Controlled Health Service-specific approach to Wellbeing Informed Care alongside an accessible implementation guide by the end of the three-year project.

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